When it comes to bad data, a lot of the problem stems from companies letting their developers off the hook. That’s right. When it comes to delivering, maintaining, and justifying their code, developers are given a lot of rope. When projects start, everyone nods their head in agreement when data quality comes up. But then there’s scope creep and sizing mistakes, and projects run long.

People start looking for things to remove. And writing error detection and correction code is not only complicated, it’s not sexy. It’s like writing documentation; no one wants to do it because it’s detailed and time consuming. This is the finish work: it’s the fancy veneer, the polished trim, and the paint color. Software vendors get this. If a data entry error shows up in a demo or a software review, it could make or break that product’s reputation. When was the last time any Windows product let you save a file with an invalid name? It doesn’t happen. The last thing a Word user needs is to sweat blood over a document and then never be able to open it again because it was named with an untypeable character.

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