(Part one of a two-part blog)

When helping my clients implement a Data Quality Issue Management Process I always come across resistance to implement the process. Even when it is up and running some stakeholders come up with interesting reasons why they don't need to use it.

The most obvious one of course being that all their data is fine so there is nothing to report. Now I am optimist in most things but experience has taught me to be a little more realistic when discussing organisation's data and although in such circumstances I really want to believe them, experience tells me that that is unlikely to be the case.

An amusing situation I have come across is that the data was wrong but they don't know what was exactly wrong with the data, so they won't report it as an issue! Others include things like: "but it's a process that needs to be fixed not the data, so I won't report it as a data quality issue" and "it's not that there's a problem with it, it's just not there"! There have also been numerous occasions when I have been told "but we have a work around for that, so don't need to report it".

Now dealing with stakeholders and the obstacles they throw up when you are trying to implement a data quality issue resolution process is exactly the kind of thing I like to write blogs on. I'd really appreciate your input in sharing similar such comments that you have experienced, so that I can identify the common themes and then share some tips and advice on how to deal with the most common push backs!

(This post originally appeared on Nicola Askham's blog site, which can be viewed here).

Register or login for access to this item and much more

All Information Management content is archived after seven days.

Community members receive:
  • All recent and archived articles
  • Conference offers and updates
  • A full menu of enewsletter options
  • Web seminars, white papers, ebooks

Don't have an account? Register for Free Unlimited Access