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4 questions to include in a UX designer interview

UX design is fast becoming a staple of modern online business. This is primarily due to its recently verifiable effect on conversions.

The designer must be on brand and on message with the company and fit within the cultural groove of the organization.

There cannot be any friction between the team and the UX designer. To ensure that your time is not wasted and that you find the right UX designer for you, here are four interview questions you must ask potential UX designers:

1. What is the most important thing to consider as a UX designer?

While this question is definitely up to interpretation, there should be little variation in terms of the answer to this specific question.

By far the most important thing to consider in UX design is the user. The entire focus of the UX designer is around the user experience. So while it may seem like an obvious question, you might be surprised how tripped up some UX designers get in the process of wireframing, collaborating, or A/B testing.

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An attendee working on an Apple Inc. laptop computer participates in the Yahoo! Inc. Mobile Developer Conference Hackathon in New York, U.S., on Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015. The Hackathon is an opportunity for mobile developers to come together and hack around the Yahoo! Inc. Mobile Developer Suite. Photographer: Victor J. Blue/Bloomberg

It’s vitally important to make sure that a UX designer candidate understands that at the end of the day, their role is all about meeting the needs of the user.

2. What programming languages are you familiar with?

Usually, you wouldn’t expect a designer to have many technical skills (other than operating complex design software). However, when it comes to UI and UX design, designers are deeply entrenched in the development process.

While it is not strictly necessary to have technical skills (such as coding in CSS, HTML, and JavaScript for websites or web apps), it can really help facilitate communication and collaboration for the design and the development team.

In addition, UX designers who know how to code in languages relevant to your projects can more quickly draft up designs and implementations for your software product.

3. How many years of experience do you have with design programs (e.g. Adobe Photoshop, Indesign, and Illustrator)?

Top UX designers have extensive experience with design programs such as Adobe Photoshop, Indesign, and Illustrator. In order to create designs, they need to know how to create user stories, draft up static images design ideas, and create realistic looking icons, buttons, and widgets.

Without several years of experience with design programs, the UX designer will be unable to perform without a great deal of guidance, mentorship, and onboarding.

If you’re looking for a junior UX designer, this may not be a problem. Otherwise, you’ll need to find a more experienced UX designer.

4. Can you talk about a time when you made a mistake? How did you fix it?

One of the most important questions to ask isn’t a technical or design question. It’s a cultural question.

When it comes to design, collaboration is of the utmost importance. Creating effective designs that resonate with your users is a daunting task that requires an entire team. Therefore, it’s extremely important to gauge how well a UX designer communicates, collaborates, and adapts, especially when things get tricky.

Conclusion

A website or application with good UX design is more likely to attract a customer over the competition regardless of the quality or color scheme. UX design applies the concepts of aesthetics and utilitarianism to establish a logical and beautiful presence online.

The idea is to create something that is as functional as it is enticing. A site that is convenient and alluring will keep potential customers on the site for longer than others. Before, when businesses first really started going online en masse, it was all about static images and wallpapers which eventually evolved into transparent squares and then, for a few dark years, comic sans.

As the styles evolved so did the effects. It was no longer about who had the coolest neon logo or the boldest chrome effect letters, but, how the site made you feel. The conveyed image or brand is the most crucial part of online shopping and is directly responsible for making massive successes out of unknown businesses.

A site can easily go viral with the right UX design and brand. UX designers are now essential for online success, but, not just any UX designer will do. You need to include the right questions to make sure the UX designer you hire is communicative, collaborative, technical and experienced.

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