An August, the New York Times published an article titled “For Today’s Graduate, Just One Word: Statistics.” This spotlight on statistics is apparently relevant, because the article ranked in that week’s top three emailed articles as tracked by the New York Times. The article cites an example of a Google employee who “uses statistical analysis of mounds of data to come up with ways to improve (Google’s) search engine.” It describes the employee as “an Internet-age statistician, one of many who are changing the image of the profession as a place for dronish number nerds. They are finding themselves increasingly in demand – and even cool.”

Using analytics that include statistics is a skill that is gaining mainstream value due to the increasingly thinner margin for decision error. It is necessary to gain insights and inferences from the treasure chest of raw transactional data that so many organizations have now stored (and continue to store) in a digital format. Organizations are drowning in data but starving for information. The article states:

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