This month we discuss the Web services integrated development environment (IDE) support from Sun, Oracle, a number of ERP vendors, Borland, Business Objects and others.

Sun: The Sun Open Net Environment (Sun.ONE) is being developed to support Web services, as an answer to Microsoft .NET. The Sun Web services IDE product is Sun ONE Studio 4 IDE. It simplifies application development using the Java2 Platform and Enterprise Edition technologies such as Enterprise Java Beans (EJB), with deployment to leading J2EE application servers. The foundation for this product is NetBeans, an open source tools platform.

Sun ONE Studio 4 IDE provides full support for the Web services standards, with SOAP and WSDL capabilities that allow developers to generate SOAP-RPC interfaces for EJB technology. The definition and binding of SOAP-RPC interfaces to EJB methods is wizard-driven with automatic code generation, exposing these interfaces as parts of Web services on demand. The runtime infrastructure needed to access EJBs via SOAP is also created, eliminating the need to hand-code these interfaces. Visit http://www.sun.com/ and search using: Web services, SOAP, WSDL and UDDI. Many relevant ONE links are available.

Oracle ERP: Oracle9i Application Server provides support for SOAP, WSDL and UDDI, together with JDeveloper Java tools for developing Web services. Oracle9i Application Server includes wireless applications for e-mail, contacts and calendar, as well as support for voice applications developed on any voice platform. Oracle has used the Oracle9i Application Server Web services capabilities to integrate business logic more effectively across the applications that make up the Oracle11i Application Suite. Visit Oracle at http://www.oracle.com/ and search using the aforementioned key words.

ERP Vendors: Most ERP vendors are moving rapidly into the provision of Web services for real-time access to specific functionality components. Oracle, PeopleSoft and SAP recognize that Web services provide a very effective foundation to better integrate applications within their own suites. For example, in 2002 PeopleSoft added Web services support to its toolkits so they understand SOAP, WSDL and UDDI. Visit http://www.peoplesoft.com/.

In 2001, SAP started implementing a Java capability into SAP's Application Server, designed to execute concurrently with its own ABAP programming language. It will allow SAP to build application components with Web service capabilities into its products to enable users to switch easily between Java- and SAP-centric applications and Web services. Visit http://www.sap.com/.

Borland: Based on the success of Delphi as a development platform using Pascal for Windows applications, this development capability has been moved to the Linux environment with the release by Borland of Kylix Enterprise 2.0. Kylix is a fast, visual development toolset that is based directly on Delphi. With Web services and XML support, Kylix offers the benefit of code-sharing, object- library and project-file sharing with Delphi. Code can be ported between both platforms and recompiled.

Kylix includes BizSnap, which builds Web services interfaces into existing applications. Kylix provides full support for building SOAP connectors with UDDI, WSDL generation and XML tools for binding XML data to application objects with transformation mapping. It also includes WebSnap tools for developing Web-based applications on Apache and CGI-enabled Web servers. DataSnap provides database-enabling support for applications. Wizards are provided for development of CORBA-based clients and servers, with database drivers for Oracle, DB2, MySQL, Interbase and MyBase, a native XML database. Visit http://www.borland.com/.

Business Objects: BusinessObjects is an integrated business intelligence (BI) toolset and platform. BusinessObjects Analytics is a suite of enterprise analytic applications. The BusinessObjects Web services SDK provides a high-level capability for building BI Web services. It exposes BusinessObjects InfoView functionality, plus the ability to drill on a chart or table, as Web services. This BI information can be delivered to a browser, PC, mobile phone or PDA. Two BI Web service development frameworks are available: one to build Web services for Microsoft .NET and one to build Web Services for J2EE and Java environments. Additional details on InfoView and other products can be found at http://www.businessobjects.com/products/infoview/. The BusinessObjects Web services SDK Users Guide provides further detail.

Other Vendors: TechMetrix provides an extensive directory of Web services vendors and products at http://www.techmetrix.com/trendmarkers/techmetrixwsd.php. IBM maintains an up-to-date list of Web services tools and products at http://www- 106.ibm.com/developerworks/views/webservices/tools.jsp.

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