February 6, 2013 – Human resources managers are increasingly turning to full or partial cloud computing options, and IT isn’t the department leading the deployment charge, according to a new survey of more than 5,700 HR professionals in North America.

HR software provider SilkRoad released the results of its survey, “The State of Talent Management 2013,” a compendium of questions on technology and trends it asked of executives and human resources practitioners during the previous year.

In-house software and applications are still the top sources for human resources management systems, according to 35 percent of  survey respondents. However, 26 percent of respondents stated their company used entirely cloud-based applications or as-a-service options, and another approximately 20 percent use a combination of on-premise and cloud for the HR systems. Unlike other enterprise deployments, HR officials tend to “own” their cloud-based management systems. The survey found that 64 percent of HR managers or executives handled cloud-based HRMS, with only 9 percent of ownership attributed to the IT department.

The prime attraction to cloud and as-a-service HR options was access regardless of location or time of day. The quick proliferation of the cloud in the HR space, and its operators, “came as a real surprise,” according to the report authors.

“Moreover, we had assumed that cloud was driven by IT departments, but in fact, we found that HR firmly controls decisions about its HRMS systems,” according to the report authors. “Future surveys will tell us whether this trend toward self-service will continue.”

Additionally, the report indicated that the use of social technologies by HR officials is undergoing a shift in use and demand. Nearly half (49 percent) indicated they use social networks during work to connect with co-workers, the top response in the category. On that same question, other top responses on the use of social included: to collaborate on new work ideas (29 percent), connect with customers (45 percent) and as a platform to share work-related content (42 percent). However, 40 percent reported that access to social media was monitored or blocked entirely.

To register for a copy of the survey, click here.