Data is data (or are data, for you grammar buffs), but on its own it is no more than static information awaiting use by intelligent beings (that would be us humans). Much has been written here—and elsewhere—about the need for better quality data, less redundant data and more easily accessible data—all of which are very important.

Yet there is another facet that trumps them all—namely, how the information is used. For example, if I somehow knew ahead of time that New Orleans was going to win the Super Bowl handily, that data would be useless unless I did something with it; say, mortgaged the farm and put down everything I had at the sports book on the Who Dat! gang. Now I’ll admit we usually aren’t dealing with such fascinating data in insurance and financial services; nonetheless it behooves us to make the best use of the data we work so hard to collect and protect.

Register or login for access to this item and much more

All Information Management content is archived after seven days.

Community members receive:
  • All recent and archived articles
  • Conference offers and updates
  • A full menu of enewsletter options
  • Web seminars, white papers, ebooks

Don't have an account? Register for Free Unlimited Access