California sometime this year could be the latest state to hire a chief data officer (CDO). The recommendation is part of legislation from State Sen Richard Pan (D-Sacramento), according to multiple reports. 

The bill calls for California's governer to hire a CDO by Jan. 1, 2016. Once hired, the CDO would be required to publish at least 150 data sets on the statewide open data portal by 2017, according to TechWire.net.

Pan's plan doesn't end there. He's also calling for a statewide open data roadmap -- with all state agency data inventoried and published on the data portal by 2022, reports have stated.

Information Management has not, however, independently confirmed the plan's existance. We've reached out to Senator Pan's office for comment and will update this article if/when a reply arrives.

Federal, state and local governments were among the first organizations to jump on the CDO wave -- which has been building for about the past five years.

Generally speaking, CDOs define how their organizations gather, manage, store, share, and protect information. At the government level, CDOs must also earn the public trust -- especially as citizens express concerns about NSA spying activities. And at profit-driven businesses, data monetization is typically the top CDO priority.

Open Data has also been a major government priority, led by President Obama. The government's Open Data strategy strives to increase citizen participation, collaboration, and transparency in government.

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