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Automation tools aiding in the war against cyber threats

The health of cyber security programs has improved over the past year and automation practices is helping in those efforts, according to the second annual Cybersecurity Report Card from security technology provider Domain Tools.

The company in July 2018 surveyed 525 global security professionals about their security posture and asked them to grade the overall health of their programs. In spite of today's volatile security climate, the report said, the research shows the security professionals feel more confident now than in previous years due to a greater investment in automated processes, threat intelligence solutions and a commitment to company-wide training.

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A stream of binary coding, text or computer processor instructions, is seen displayed on a laptop computer screen as a man works to enter data on the computer keyboard in this arranged photograph in London, U.K., on Wednesday, Dec. 23, 2015. The U.K.s biggest banks fear cyber attacks more than regulation, faltering economic growth and other potential risks, and are concerned that a hack could be so catastrophic that it could lead to a state rescue, according to a survey. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg

When compared with 2017, the percentage of respondents that said their organization should be graded as a C or lower declined. A large majority (92 percent) of the respondents who gave their companies a A grade said they use automation to simplify time consuming processes. Conversely, D and F companies said their processes are highly manual.

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Some 5 percent more organizations plan to step up security awareness training in the coming year than did last year, and the number that intend to skip training initiatives decreased by half from 2017.

In addition, 71 percent of grade A organizations have the ability to expand from one indicator to a larger map of threat infrastructure, but 35 percent of organizations still lack in this area. A and B organizations were more likely to follow-up on clues and evidence and conduct forensic analysis of compromised machines compared with D and F teams.

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