In the technology world, there’s always talk about “disruption.” This refers to new or innovated technology or business models that fundamentally change the world to which they are applied. Advocates for disruption take pride in their achievements, and rightfully so: driving productive change – rather than simply reacting to the changing world around you – is difficult and often risky work.

The problem with disruption is that it appeals to the free thinkers in a group and scares the pants off everyone else, including (at times) those in the C-suite. This leaves potentially valuable ideas without sponsorship, which means they are likely to wither and die.

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