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Applications development increasingly done by other job roles

More developers work with application programming interfaces than anyone else in a typical organization. But the reach of APIs is increasingly touching more people than just those who code, according to a report from Postman, which provides a collaboration platform for API development.

For its annual State of the API study, the company surveyed more than 10,000 API developers, users, testers and executives, and less than half (47 percent) of the respondents identified themselves as being either a front-end or back-end developer. The field also included quality assurance engineers, technical team leads, API architects, DevOps specialists and others.

The survey data showed that the API ecosystem is expanding beyond developers, according to Abhinav Asthana, Postman’s co-founder and CEO. Working directly with APIs has become part of a surprising number of positions, including non-developers such as executives and technical writers.

While API security is a hot topic, driven by frequent reports of API security breaches and misuse, nearly three quarters of the respondents said their APIs are “very secure” or have “above-average security.” Only 3 percent
stated that their APIs were not at all secure.

The most helpful enhancement API producers can make is to provide better examples in the documentation (64 percent), followed by standardization (59 percent), and sample code (58 percent).

API users also find real-world use cases, better workflows, and additional tools, helpful, although to a lesser extent.
More than half of the respondents (54 percent) said microservices are the most exciting technology for developers in the next year, while 46 percent said containers and 44 percent said serverless architecture.

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