Will a robot take your job? Few people think so, according to a new report from Genpact, a professional services firm.

The company surveyed more than 5,000 people from across the U.S., the U.K. and Australia, and found that only 10 percent of them perceive artificial intelligence as an immediate threat to their jobs. A majority (58 percent), however, fear AI’s impact on their children’s career opportunities, and 90 percent of the respondents agree that up and coming generations will need new skills to succeed as the technology becomes more prevalent in the workplace.

At present, though, those skills are not being taught on the job. Only 25 percent of the survey respondents indicated that their employer was equipping them with the skills needed to take advantage of AI. Despite this, nearly 80 percent of the executives included in the survey say that their employees will soon be comfortable working with robots.

“Artificial intelligence brings a seismic shift in the future of work, making some roles obsolete and enhancing others, while at the same time creating new jobs and even spawning new professions,” says Sanjay Srivastava, chief digital officer at Genpact. “Our research shows that employees want and need additional skills to embrace these opportunities.”

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Bob Violino

Bob Violino

Bob Violino is a freelance technology and business writer who covers a variety of topics, including big data and analytics, cloud computing, information security and mobile technology.