DEC 23, 2013 11:00am ET

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Column

When Agile BI is Not Agile

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Through our collective experience at my firm, my colleagues and I have collaborated on many different projects together. And in just about every case, our differing backgrounds required us to adapt or assimilate different methodologies put forth by members of the team or our clients.

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Comments (4)
Ahhh . . . "Agile" development, the programmers' methodology for focusing on the tree leaf -- never mind the entire tree -- & making it damn near impossible for those responsible for the forest (read: ENTERPRISE information architecture) to plan, document, or account for the resources available & spent. "Agile" development . . . the excuse programmers use for justifying repeated failed attempts at delivering products users want or need in lieu of taking the time up-front to acquire actual data & system requirements. "Agile" development . . . the sneering attitude programmers visit upon technical database administrators when admonished to use platform functionality instead of their own cloudy crystal balls to foresee or prevent the majority of stupid user tricks -- stupid user tricks which those self-same technal DBAs now must repair. "Agile" development . . . back to the bad old days of programmers writing 100 lines of code so twisted & convoluted (with NO documentation or explanation, often with the sole purpose of retrieving something as mundane as the date & time from a server) so that s/he created a permanent revenue stream for her/himself -- no one else can read the code, much less decipher it. Ahh . . . "Agile" development . . .
Posted by Jolene J | Thursday, December 26 2013 at 8:51AM ET
I have been working on an MDM project following agile (what client calls) methodology. One of the key issue we constantly face is the challenges in getting the work done by other teams which do not follow agile. Often this results in undelivered code & failure to meet the commitment done to business owner.

Can you please throw some light on how you handle this? I am somewhat convinced this problem is in most of the organizations as not many follow agile methodology enterprise wide. Getting work from colleagues outside core agile team is a major pain area.

Posted by Prashanta C | Saturday, December 28 2013 at 7:57PM ET
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